American troops in the second battle of the marne

After it became clear that the Germans had not only failed in their aim to win the war in this offensive, but had in fact lost ground, a number of German commanders, including Crown Prince Wilhelmbelieved the war was lost.

American troops in the second battle of the marne

Dubbed the Second Battle of the Marne, the conflict ended several days later in a major victory for the Allies. The German general Erich Ludendorffconvinced that an attack in Flanders, the region stretching from northern France into Belgium, was the best route to a German victory in the war, decided to launch a sizeable diversionary attack further south in order to lure Allied troops away from the main event.

Visit Website On the morning of July 15, then, 23 divisions of the German 1st and 3rd Armies attacked the French 4th Army east of Reims, while 17 divisions of the 7th Army, assisted by the 9th Army, attacked the French 6th Army to the west of the city.

When the Germans began their advance after an initial artillery bombardment, however, they found that the French had set up a line of false trenches, manned by only a few defenders. The real front line of trenches lay further on, and had scarcely been touched by the bombardment.

This deceptive strategy had been put in place by the French commander-in-chief, Philippe Petain.On this day in , near the Marne River in the Champagne region of France, the Germans begin what would be their final offensive push of World War I.

American troops in the second battle of the marne

Dubbed the Second Battle of the Marne, the. Battles - The Second Battle of the Marne, In what began as the last major German offensive of the First World War, the Second Battle of the Marne developed into a significant Allied victory.

Jun 27,  · The Marne River in Château-Thierry, where French, British and American forces held back German troops in and launched a decisive counteroffensive, part of the Second Battle of the Marne.

First World initiativeblog.com - Battles - The Second Battle of the Marne,

The Second Battle of the Marne (French: Seconde Bataille de la Marne), or Battle of Reims (15 July – 6 August ) was the last major German offensive on the Western Front during the First World War. The attack failed when an Allied counterattack, supported by several hundred tanks, overwhelmed the Germans on their right flank, inflicting severe casualties.

Second Battle of the Marne, (July 15–18, ), last large German offensive of World War I. Following the success of his four major offensives in France from March to June , the chief of the German supreme command, General Erich Ludendorff, conceived another offensive as a diversion to draw French troops away from the Flanders front, against which he planned to direct his final decisive .

Background The Second Battle of the Marne marked the turning of the tide in World War I. It began with the last German offensive of the conflict and was quickly followed by the first allied offensive victory of

The Second Battle of the Marne